Are you drinking enough water?

There’s more water than any other substance in our bodies. We have all heard the statistic that human bodies contain up to 70% water, but really this is pretty inaccurate and depends on variables like how much fat is on your body, how old you are and whether you are male or female. But to put it into perspective, bone which is the driest body part still contains around 30% water.

Oxygen is our number one most critical substance for survival but we tend to forget that humans can only live a couple of days without water compared to many weeks with no food. There are countless headlines devoted to food, yet drinking more pure clean water is rarely discussed. It’s common for many people to drink no pure water and subsist on only tea, coffee, soda and juices. Yes, these beverages contain water but they can also be dehydrating.   

 Coffee is delicious but also dehydrating.

Coffee is delicious but also dehydrating.

Is water the number one most common deficiency?

Natural whole foods have a large percentage of water. Fruits, vegetables, meats. But the modern diet of highly processed foods has been completely stripped of all water to be shelf stable and are very hard to eat without some liquid. These dry foods will draw water out from the body to become more digestible.

Water is used as a medium in our body to transport nutrients, hormones and chemical messengers to organs, tissues and cells. It fills the volume inside of our cells and outside our cells.

Our entire GI tract relies on mucus to lubricate it and protect it from corrosive enzymes, acid and alkaline substances. Mucous substances are composed of 98% water so it’s no surprise that dehydration can cause digestive issues. If mucus dries out due to body dehydration it wouldn't be able to protect delicate tissue from corrosive substances. Water is also needed for all digestive juices including bile and stomach acid, these can dry up if not enough water is present.

Water is also used to cushion bones and joints, regulates body temperature, flushes toxins, maintains electrical properties of cells and much more.

Are we only really thirsty when our mouth is dry?

Our body in a dehydrated state may still prioritise some water for saliva to keep the mouth moist for digestion. So it is misleading to think that we are only thirsty if our mouth is dry, by the time saliva dries up completely we are probably severely dehydrated.

The thirst sensation begins to gradually fail if we are chronically under consuming water. Once I upped my water intake it became obvious that I was thirsty the whole time but didn't register because the sensation came back.   

Some common signs of dehydration:

Headache

Fatigue

Cravings

Cramps

Irritability

Some signs of chronic dehydration:

Heartburn

Joint pain

Constipation

Migraines

Back pain

Are you drinking enough water?

The best way to know is to track your water intake. Get a bottle and count how many times you drink it daily, most people are surprised that they have been overestimating how much water they actually drink. There are many theories about how much water to drink, but it’s recommended to not exceed one gallon (3.7L) a day because you could be losing minerals and electrolytes. Aim for around 2L and adjust for more if it’s hot or you’re exercising. Once you start drinking more water your natural thirst response will come back and you will crave drinking pure water daily.